How to disable automatic restart after Windows Update

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I have installed Windows Updates to several servers running Windows Server Standard and now those servers are asking for a reboot. They offer to reboot either outside the active hours which can only be in a 12 hour lapse or I can schedule a reboot in the next 7 days. I would like to not reboot for now and reboot manually when I know I can because these servers are sensitive and possibly cannot be rebooted in the next 7 days. Is there a way to do this and just make it a manual reboot just like we can do with any previous Windows Server system?

Might try stopping or disabling the Windows Update wuauserv service. Regards, Dave Patrick We could try to use the three methods below:. Click Start and type Task Scheduler. To disable automatic reboots right-click on Reboot and select disable.

Open your start menu and type Group, then click Edit group policy. Double click Configure Automatic Updates and enable the policy, and configure it as needed. Also other group policy in Windows Update could be helpful. For example:. No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic update installations. Use Registry. Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff microsoft.

I changed the local GPO choosing option 5 “Allow local admin to choose setting” after enabling “Configure Automatic Updates” and I enabled “No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates intallations”. Windows Update still tells me that it will reboot. Let’s see what it does tonight. I am proposing previous helpful replies as “Answered”. Please feel free to try it and let me know the result. If the reply is helpful, please remember to mark it as answer which can help other community members who have same questions and find the helpful reply quickly.

The only work around I’ve got is connect requently and put the furthest date available in the scheduled reboot. The next seven days are offered so if you connect in two days, you will get two new days you can schedule your reboot. It’s not the most convenient way to postpone a reboot but it works I do understand the logic of having to reboot after doing certain important and maybe bulky updates but it is funny that we were able to just not reboot with previous versions of Windows Server but just has to reboot and schedule it right away.

I think it is Microsoft trying to enforce better stability. Despite telling people for years and years that they should not apply patches and then wait extended periods of time before rebooting, people continue to do it.

Running a system that has been patched, yet not rebooted, is one way to have a less stable system. Some files which do not need a reboot to take effect have been placed into operation. Other files which need a reboot to take effect have not been placed into operation. The stable environment wants all patched files in effect.

Yes, the system works, but the longer it works in this manner, the higher the probability that something will occur that was not tested, as the tests include the content of the patch. The counter argument is ‘it is my system and I want to have full control of it’, which is a valid point.

But at the same time, the arguer will hold Microsoft accountable for any type of instability, even if they are not following Microsoft’s recommendations for patch application. If you want to control reboots, implement a complete system that controls the application of patches.

Then you can apply the patch at the time you will allow a reboot. You are in complete control of the patch and the reboot, thereby satisfying the desire to have complete control of the system while at the same time ensuring your system is as stable as Microsoft can make it.

How about crazy idea microsoft lets me schedule one day a week to reboot? Sure, i CAN implement patch control software. I might even find something that’s free. Office Office Exchange Server. Not an IT pro? Resources for IT Professionals. Sign in. United States English. Ask a question. Quick access.

Search related threads. Remove From My Forums. Asked by:. Archived Forums. Windows Server General. Sign in to vote. Hello, I have installed Windows Updates to several servers running Windows Server Standard and now those servers are asking for a reboot. Thank you in advance for your help. Tuesday, March 26, PM. Hi, We could try to use the three methods below: 1.

For example: No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic update installations 3. Use Registry 1. Wednesday, March 27, AM. Thank you Dave. I stopped and disabled the service. I’ll just wait and see. Thank you Carl, I disabled the “Reboot” task in the Task Scheduler I changed the local GPO choosing option 5 “Allow local admin to choose setting” after enabling “Configure Automatic Updates” and I enabled “No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates intallations” I checked the registry and theAUOptions is already configured to 3 Windows Update still tells me that it will reboot.

Hi, It’s OK. If any further help needed, please feel free to post back. Friday, March 29, AM. Hi, Unfortunately, my server rebooted. Thank you for your answers Cheers. Tuesday, April 2, AM. Tuesday, April 2, PM. You are in complete control of the patch and the reboot, thereby satisfying the desire to have complete control of the system while at the same time ensuring your system is as stable as Microsoft can make it How about no?

Nah, I’ll just spend my free time here, boxing an iceberg, because microsoft listens. Sunday, September 15, AM.

 
 

 

How to Stop Automatic Restart Windows 10 After Update

 
To check out the possibility of a malware causing the automatic system restarts, run a deep malware scan.

 
 

Manage device restarts after updates (Windows 10) – Windows Deployment | Microsoft Docs

 
 

This is not the first time i have lost unsaved work due to this annoying function, that almost every Windows user hates. I’m trying to behave, but it is really hard to keep calm after loosing unsaved work multiple times. Why is it that Windows cannot just wait until the user decides to restart at a convenient time?

It’s not like the end of the world that users doesn’t restart at a specific time. In a time where Apple’s Mac is already “stealing” a lot of Windows customers, it is a very risky and dumb feature to add to Windows.

So back to the question. I tried following some tutorials on YouTube, but little did it help obviously, as i just came home and found my computer restarted, and my work deleted. Was this reply helpful? Yes No. Sorry this didn’t help. Thanks for your feedback. When i double click the “No auto-restart with automatic installations of scheduled updates” i get a popup in where i can enable the policy.

Though after enabling it, i get asked to set active hours.. All my hours are active. I don’t want any restarts in active or inactive hours. I just want Windows to stop restarting automatically no matter what time it is.

I will restart myself when i need it. It’s not possible to disable the restart, because the changes made by a feature update can only be processed while the computer is not being used. Most software operates this way. I have the same issue. I am running computer simulations on my machine which take hours to days. You come back to your machine and it has rebooted, hussah! This is my machine and if I want to use it to make a living I don’t want to lose work just because you morons think that an automatic reboot is a funny idea!

I don’t want to change active hours. I tried the UpdateOrchestrator option but it already says “Disabled” for reboot, so that obviously doesn’t work. And I don’t have Windows 10 Pro so I can’t use the gpedit option. What update is it? Only updates like the cumulative ones and cumulative. Plus, it will only ask for a restart after the update cumulative is done downloading and finished installing.

Actually, after restarting, then it will counts as a successful install. Normally, Windows will not ask for a restart, or automatically restart, never heard off automatically restart unless it pertains to that update.

I never have that issue before. Well, count me as another who hates it. Giving me no option after downloading and installing an update which does not warn the user of this ahead of time other than to have my computer restart without my consent once my active hours which can only be set to a maximum of 18 hours are over There is no valid reason to prevent users from postponing the restart for as long as we wish, and doing it at a time of our choosing.

Anything else leaves me inclined to disable updates altogether. If they can’t understand that, they’ll be left in Linux’s dust. For those that consider Linux too small a contender for that last sentence to be anything but a joke: consider that Android is just a modified Linux OS, and currently holds the largest market share among all internet-connected devices, having overtaken Windows by Not long after Windows 10 was released, come to think And if you search on Microsoft’s own bing.

That’s more than if you search “Avengers Endgame”, for an indication of how popular the idea of disabling this “feature” is. When a customer asks for something, a smart business doesn’t respond by trying to tell the customer why they shouldn’t want that instead of actually giving it to them.

And no, I’m not going to pay for a more expensive version of Windows so that I can use gpedit to disable this stupidity that never should have existed in the first place. Trying to frustrate me into paying more isn’t a great business plan, either. Choose where you want to search below Search Search the Community. Search the community and support articles Windows Windows 10 Search Community member. Suleiman Boutzamat. Is there any REAL way to disable this cancer feature?

This alone is very difficult to argue against in a Mac vs. Windows discussion. Luckily for Microsoft Microsoft have secured themselves from a law suit in their policy. MS knows that all Windows users hates this feature, and yet they still have it. This thread is locked. You can follow the question or vote as helpful, but you cannot reply to this thread. I have the same question Report abuse. Details required :.

Cancel Submit. Previous Next. Yes, of course. Setup active hours. How satisfied are you with this reply? Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site. Omoikane Independent Advisor. Select “Enabled”, and then click “OK”. Close the local group policy editor. If the above steps don’t have the effect you desired please let me know! In reply to A. User’s post on February 14, Start menu — Settings app — Update and Security — Windows Update — Change active hours Thanks for your answer – but it’s not useful.

In reply to Omoikane’s post on February 14, In reply to Suleiman Boutzamat’s post on February 15, Hello, Try the process below: 1. Select the Reboot it does not have an extension file right-click it and select “Rename”. Rename the Reboot file to “Reboot. Right-click inside the folder, select “New,” and click on “Folder”. Name the New Folder “Reboot”. Now restart your computer.

This will disable Window’s ability to restart automatically. If this solution has the desired effect let me know. Kirk Jones. In reply to Omoikane’s post on February 16, This is what I’ve had to do the UpdateOrchestrator option posted by Omoikane To the other answers: Active Hours are not a valid solution. I leave my computer with long running processes over night, and I come back in the morning and discover my system rebooted.

This has cost me a lot of time and money. So happy! In reply to PaulPChou’s post on April 14, This site in other languages x.